What does it take to shock us?

However deplorable the terrorist attacks were a decade ago, and however much the impact has reverberated around the world, it remains a mystery to me how we can be shocked beyond measure by one circumstance, whilst another source of pain to society remains almost unnoticed.

There were just under 3000 awful and premature deaths on September 11th 2001 – devastating terorist strikes, destroying the hopes and plans of 3000 families;  reverberating across New York communities, leaving orphans and widows in its wake.  There have been almost daily incidents around the globe since then, with too many of them causing death tolls above 100.

But in the decade since then, nearly 7000 US citizens (military personnel and contractors) have been killed on the war fronts of Afghanistan and Iraq.  It is difficult to count the deaths on the other side, but estimates vary between 25 and 50 thousand directly killed and maybe 20 times that number of “excess” deaths caused by a combination of sanctions and war conditions.  What an awful term: “excess deaths”!

But where are our thresholds of unacceptability?  The same decade has seen around 150 thousand homicides across American society – 15 Americans killed by local violence for every single one killed either in the twin towers or in the war zones since.  And what of the 360 thousand Americans killed in road traffic accidents – casualties of life.  Are these any less devastating to the friends and relatives?

But here is the real rub!  Nearly 1 million “excess” deaths across the USA because the American health system has so many holes in it!  If the life expectancy in the USA was equal to the average value across the OECD nations, more than 900 thousand lives would have been saved in the last decade.  Investment in UK health reform in the same period has successfully closed the gap from its poor performance, so that in 2009 – the latest full year data, the UK crossed over to better than average life expectancy.  But procrastination about American healthcare reform  has seen its gap continue to widen almost every year, so that the average American can expect to die 4.8 years sooner than his or her Japanese counterpart, and 2.1 years sooner than the average throughout OECD countries.

How does the shockwave of such appalling devastation of life and relationships pass by so unnoticed?

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